What’s new at the Pendlebury?

Now that we are well into the swing of Lent Term, I thought for this week’s post I would do a quick update on what’s new at the Pendlebury Library!

Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

To celebrate, to commemorate: Pierre Boulez (1925 – 2016)

It was with great sadness that MusiCB3 learned that the composer and conductor Pierre Boulez died on 5th January at the age of 90.

Utterly impossible, of course, to do justice in this modest space to THE giant of 20th century music. Utterly impossible to even begin to encompass his influence on the course of music in our time. Utterly impossible at this point in time to be coherent about the legacy he has left not only as a composer but also as one of the world’s most respected conductors. However, it is surely the case that without Boulez, the course of 20th century music would have been very different.
Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

To celebrate to commemorate: 2016 anniversaries

 

2016 anniversaries1

It’s that time of year again, and it falls to me to uncover some of the anniversaries the music world will be celebrating in 2016.

Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

2015: Another year has gone …

It seems only yesterday I wrote the post “To celebrate, to commemorate: 2014” to pay tribute to some musicians who died in 2014 and here I am again to remember some of the relevant figures in the music world who passed away in 2015. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Cambridge success at the British Composer Awards 2015

On Wednesday 9th December 2015, the British Composer Awards 2015 took place at the BFI Southbank, in a ceremony celebrating the art of contemporary music composition.  Here at the Faculty of Music, University of Cambridge, we were delighted to see some familiar faces on the shortlist.

Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

A very spooky Christmas

Ye Mystletoe Bough. Written composed & arranged by Arthur Wood (Comedian) A1871.1195

Ye Mystletoe Bough.
Written composed & arranged by Arthur Wood (Comedian)
A1871.1195

As well as the usual delights of the festive season—feasting , games, music and dancing—telling stories has long been a feature, especially spooky stories, which became increasingly popular in Victorian times, reaching their height in the early twentieth century when M.R. James, one-time Provost of King’s, published his ghost stories. One of the most popular of Victorian eerie tales was the legend of the Mistletoe Bough. The poem, written by Samuel Rogers,  was published in the 1820s, and became popular nationally after Henry Bishop (of Home sweet home fame) set it to music in the 1830s. By the 1850s, it was a seasonal scary favourite in Victorian homes, and remained popular with those born in the era through into the twentieth century. My grandfather enjoyed terrifying me by chanting it ghoulishly, when I was a small child. Probably as a result I can still sing it almost word perfect 40 years on! Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Zak’s “Mobile”: is the rest noise?

Hans Keller, Music and Musicians 1985

Hans Keller, Music and Musicians, July 1985

On 5th June 1961 an event of seismic significance shook the Established Musical World: during a broadcast concert given by the English Chamber Orchestra, under the baton of Bruno Maderna, the World Première of Piotr Zak‘s Mobile for Tape and Percussion was given featuring the percussion virtuosi Claude Tessier and Anton Schmidt. The astute and attentive reader of this blog will, at once, realize that we have already written about this key event, but, fear not, for this is not one of those all-too-frequent repeats one all-too-frequently finds on the airwaves these days.

Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment